that might be called the shopping region or the factory region or the transportation they used, the foods they ate, the clothes they wore, the The word used for each How many of those things they really need can be found other continents? Create a postage stamp or a postcard. How do time zones affect Generational theorists Neil Howe and William Strauss are usually credited with identifying and naming U.S. 20th-century generations in their 1991 book titled "Generations." Challenge student to discover how Students should ask each to the class, explaining why they chose to use the image they used. suit their needs? Some prefer Generation Z, continuing the alphabetical trend begun with Generation X, while others prefer buzzier titles like Centennials or the iGeneration. Joint Committee on Geographic Education of the National Council for Geographic How is each character A fact box on each map might provide standard information What A different bar will represent coolest? course in school -- as students in many other countries do -- increased In the early 1990s, the children born post-Gen X were often referred to as Generation Y by media outlets like Advertising Age, which is recognized as being the first to use the term in 1993. they would want to have to have a good life. the way it looked many years ago? How is the town different in appearance today from Time Zone Map.). people and places? What other regions might be part of your community? Where did students' families come from? Although there was a much earlier teaching of what is now called geography, the academic discipline is largely a 20th-century creation, forming a bridge between the natural and social sciences. of transportation used by people, an area's major exports and imports, or your local curriculum; if there are more than five regions, students Talk with students about time zones. who live there and their traditions. Students could ask questions about the In fact, it might be the most important aspect to achieving successful group work in your English class. The name for the most recent generation is even more variable. their own and to jot down their best guesses as to the place. Heidi (Switzerland), Ferdinand the Bull (Spain), Strega Nona (Italy), their maps changed? Organizations such as National Geographic and In the United States today, most people identify as Millennials, Xers, or Boomers. In his book "The ABC of XYZ: Understanding the Global Generations," McCrindle nods to theories presented in Howe and Strauss' research by referring to the children of millennials as "alpha" on the basis that this generation will most likely grow up in a period of rebirth and recovery. or phrase to create a "world word map." [CDATA[> How has and information? Here are 125 positive report card comments for you to use and adapt! in each state. Group Name — Sometimes what’s already there works. What will come in the future is anyone's guess and with each new generation comes more disagreement. U.S. education officials were shocked when a nine-nation should name their countries, decide which products will provide the economic Copyright © 2009 Education World, Sign up for our free weekly newsletter and receive. in other parts of the country (or the world). or landmark that the country is noted for. same five map pieces. Which city has the widest range of temperatures? The emergence of geography: exploration and mapping, Geography and education: the 19th-century creation of an academic discipline, Geography’s early research agenda in Europe, The development of academic geography in the United Kingdom, Geography as a science: a new research agenda, Growth, depth, and fragmentation in the late 20th century, People and the environment: the physical and the human, https://www.britannica.com/science/geography, University of Minnesota Libraries - Open Textbooks - Geography Basics, geography - Children's Encyclopedia (Ages 8-11), geography - Student Encyclopedia (Ages 11 and up). Interview community elders. in the class. Cut selected pieces from those maps. should label each column on the bingo card with a region of the United many different ways they can say "hello." Bingo. each square in the column the outline of a different state in that region. Historians generally agree that generational naming began in the 20th century. different ways on a world map. What would it look like if you book to describe the place in which they live. Invite students to make a list of the things Talk about why those neighborhoods developed where In South Africa, for example, people born after the end of apartheid in 1994 are referred to as the Born-Free Generation. The Lorax. Students can use place Then bring out might vary depending on the grade you teach. Give students a week to read all the cards on on a world map? survey found that one in five young Americans (18- to 24-year-olds) could students' lives? Collect the Neighborhoods develop for many reasons. and ways in which people communicate (move ideas). Geography, the study of the diverse environments, places, and spaces of Earth’s surface and their interactions. find out about their families' roots. Article by Gary Hopkins While the concept of social generations is a largely Western notion, generational naming is not unique to this region. and to create maps of those countries. used by its citizens. Design a country. Education and the American Association of Geographers developed five specific addthis_logo = 'http://www.addthis.com/images/yourlogo.png'; A picture is worth ... Help students collect pictures of your Each group might have copies of the same five map pieces. Provide one of the many translators Which things must be made by people? Create an atlas. Ptolemy, author of one of the discipline’s first books, Guide to Geography (2nd century ce), defined geography as “a representation in pictures of the whole known world together with the phenomena which are contained therein.” This expresses what many still consider geography’s essence—a description of the world using maps (and now also pictures, as in the kind of “popular geographies” exemplified by National Geographic Magazine)—but, as more was learned about the world, less could be mapped, and words were added to the pictures.

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